SUCCESSFUL REVASCULARIZATION PROCEDURE IN AN IMMATURE PERMANENT NECROTIC SECOND LOWER MOLAR: A CASE REPORT WITH 4.5-YEARS FOLLOW-UP

Luana Heck, Theodoro Weissheimer, Marco Antonio Hungaro Duarte, Rodrigo Ricci Vivan, Murilo Priori Alcalde, Ricardo Abreu da Rosa, Marcus Vinicius Reis Só

Abstract


Background: Infection control is mandatory for revascularization procedures, enabling to eliminate patient's clinical symptoms and signs. Despite presenting a complex morphology when compared to anterior teeth, if a strict disinfection protocol is adopted and the revascularization procedure's biological principles are followed, the therapy can be successful in molar teeth.

Methods: This case report aims to present a clinical case of successful revascularization in an immature permanent necrotic second lower molar. Clinical decisions and explanations regarding possible mechanisms related to the treatment's success in a tooth with complex morphology are discussed. Results: Revascularization procedures were performed on a 12-year-old male patient diagnosed with symptomatic periapical periodontitis in a tooth 37. The case highlights the need for infection control and biological principles that surrounds the success of this therapy. Follow-up times presented in this case were six months, 1, 2, 4 and 4.5-years, respectively. Continued root development was observed, and the tooth remains intact and without symptoms.

Conclusion: The association of infection control and the biological principles of revascularization procedures allow the maintenance and continuation of tooth development, even when these present complex morphologies.


Keywords


Apexogenesis; Infection Control; Molar; Revascularization.

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.19177/jrd.v9e3202112-18

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Journal of Research in Dentistry, University of Southern of Santa Catarina, Santa Catarina, ISSN 2317-5907

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